LEED CONSULTING   |   SOME QUICK POINTS

CONSTRUCTION WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANNING

In the past, when landfill capacity was readily available and disposal fees were low, recycling or reuse of construction waste was not economically feasible. Construction materials were less expensive than labor, and construction site managers focused on worker productivity rather than on material conservation.

Also, recycling infrastructure and recycled-materials marketplaces that process and resell construction debris did not exist. However, in recent years ever-decreasing landfill capacities have caused tipping fees to increase.

While waste management plans, like the one drafted for RG Williams Construction by BMA Designs, require time and money to draft and implement; in the long term, they provide guidance to achieve substantial savings throughout the construction process.

Recyclable materials have differing market values, depending on the presence of local recycling facilities, reprocessing costs, and the availability of virgin materials on the market. In BMA Designs’ LEED experience, we have found that the costs of developing and implementing a construction waste management plan is out weighed by the return our client, the contractor, receives from market value of recyclable materials and savings on tipping fees.

USE OF REGIONAL MATERIALS AND MATERIALS WITH RECYCLABLE CONTENT

Products with recycled content reduce virgin material use and solid waste volumes. As the number of building products containing recycled content grows the marketplace for recycled materials continues to develop.

Many commonly used products are now available with recycled content, including metals, concrete, masonry, gypsum wallboard, acoustic tile, carpet, ceramic tile, rubber flooring and wall base, and insulation.

LEED Projects demand cross-functional team work from all parties involved in the project. Cross-functional team work results in a more comprehensive approach to the overall project and an increasing functionally efficient facility.